QRStuff.com - QR Code Generator

Q1 2014: QR Code Trends

Posted: April 2nd, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

Here’s what’s been going in our part of the QR code world over the past 3 months. The following data is based on the QR codes created by QRStuff.com users during January, February and March 2014.

Who Was Scanning QR Codes?

On a world-wide basis the location of QR code scan events hasn’t really changed all that much for us over the past 12 months. USA, UK, Australia and Canada are still in the top 5 however Malaysia has now moved up and pushed Germany down to #6.

We recorded scans from 216 countries during the quarter with Morocco, Kazakhstan, Ghana and Bolivia showing solid increases at the back of the field, and first-time scan events recorded from Equatorial Guinea and South Sudan.

QR Code Scans (World) Q1 2014

For the USA the top 10 is still basically the same as last quarter however Virginia has continued its steady move up through the ranks over the past few quarters. Florida and Illinois are showing signs of softening but this hasn’t affected their rankings. Hawaii and Alaska aren’t shown on the map but came in at #40 (0.36%) and #44 (0.22%) respectively.

QR Code Scans (USA By State) Q1 2014

The top 10 for Europe remains essentially unchanged, and Europe continues to account for approximately 25% of the global scan events recorded.

QR Code Scans (Europe) Q1 2014

 

What Were They Scanning Them With?

iPhones are still the most popular devices used for scanning QR codes. Over the past 12 months we’ve seen Windows devices move into double digits (they only accounted for 2-3% of scans in Q1 2012) with this growth principally at the expense of iOS devices and Blackberrys. Scans recorded from Android devices have increased globally over the past 2 years (up from 31% in Q1 2012) but have fallen away by 2% in the USA.

On a global basis the split for iOS devices was 39.4% iPhone and 10.1% iPad.

QR Code Scan By Device Q1 2014

 

What QR Codes Were Being Scanned?

We keep an eye on two metrics – QR codes created and QR codes scanned – and it’s fairly safe to expect that the relative values for a given data type should be pretty much the same.

Following this logic through, if the relative number of scans recorded for a particular QR code data type is significantly greater than the relative number of those QR codes created, then it would indicate a greater number of scans per QR code, meaning that that particular data type is perhaps more effective in engaging than other data types. The reverse would also apply – if the relative scans are less than the relative rate of creation, then that data type could be considered to be less effective.

Obviously there’s a fairly significant flaw in that assumption – placement (contact details QR codes on business cards will get always get less scans than website URL QR codes in magazines) – however major disparities between the two relative figures that can’t be otherwise explained definitely give a strong hint as to which data types are more effective than others.

Our App Store Download data type is a case in point – while only representing 2.4% of the QR codes created by our users, they account for a whopping 20.9% of total scan events recorded. This data type is definitely punching above its weight in terms of its ability to engage with users and attract scans.

QR Codes And Scans By Data Type Q1 2014

 

 


How To Make QR Code Labels & Stickers

Posted: March 15th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: General | Comments Off

Make QR Code Labels & StickersHere’s some step-by-step instructions on using a label template in MS Word 2010 to create QR code sticker labels from a pre-made set of QR codes using the mail-merge function. We’ve used the Avery 22805 label template (1.5″ x 1.5″ 24 per sheet) but you can use any digital label template you want.

These instructions assume you’ve already created your QR code images and have saved them locally on your computer. The end result will be a sheet of labels with each one containing a different QR code.

Create A Data Source

The mail-merge process intially requires a “data source” which should be prepared first. The data source contains the path location on your computer for each of the indivdual QR codes images that will be displayed in each of the labels (24 in our case since we are creating 24 different stickers on a single sheet of labels). The simplest way is to create an MS Excel spreadsheet contining the image file paths for each QR code in column 1. This column also needs to have a field label in row 1 which will be used as a reference in the mail-merge process later on. We used the label “qrcodes”.

Set up your Excel mail-merge data source file

Create and save this spreadsheet for later use.

TIP: MS Word can be a bit fussy about file paths so it’s best not to have any spaces in name of the folder your QR codes are saved in, or in the names of the QR code images themselves. Any weird characters in the folder name or image names should be avoided as well – just stick to a-z and 0-9

Open Your Label Template

Either open your digital template in MS Word (we downloaded our Avery 22805 label template from the Avery website) or use one of the templates pre-loaded into MS Word.

  1. Select the “Mailings” command ribbon
  2. Select “Start Mail Merge” and then “Labels”. Choose the template you require and press OK, or if you have already opened your own downloaded digital template just press Cancel (don’t know why this step has to be done when using your own template, but it won’t work if you don’t)

Open your label template

Choose your label template

The Mail-Merge Process

  1. Click on “Select Recipients” in the toolbar ribbon and then ”Use Existing List” and navigate to the Excel data source file created above.

Open your Excel data source file

A dialog box will then appear -  ensure that both “Sheet1″ and “First row of data contains column headers” are both selected and press OK.

Open your Excel data source file

  1. Position the cursor in the first label cell:
    1. Press CTRL + F9 to open the curly brackets, type INCLUDEPICTURE and then a space.
    2. Press CTRL + F9 again, type IF TRUE and then a space.
    3. Press CTRL + F9 again, type MERGEFIELD and then the name of the field identifier you used in your Excel spreadsheet created above. We used ”qrcodes” so we type that.
    4. Cursor across to the just before the last nested curly bracket and type \d.

After completing these steps you should have ended up with the following in the first cell:

{INCLUDEPICTURE {IF TRUE {MERGEFIELD qrcodes}} \d}

TIP:The scripting shown above won’t work if you just copy and paste it in. You will need to do the whole CTRL + F9 thing as outlined in the steps shown above.

NOTE: You can also include other columns of information in your data source (such as a text label associated with each QR code), and the scripting could be extended at this stage of the process to include another MERGEFIELD parameter that pulls that data into the label as well.

  1. Click on “Update Labels” which will populate all label cells with the mail-merge scripting. Each script is set up to pull consecutive images from your Excel data source file. eg; first listed QR code into the first cell, second QR code into second cell, third QR code into third cell, and so on.
  1. Click on “Finish & Merge” and select “Edit Individual Documents”.  Select Merge “All” Records and click OK. This will run the script in each label cell and replace the actual script with the QR code image referenced in it.

Merge your data source with label template

A new document will be opened showing each of the individual QR codes in their own label cell.

The finished label template populated with the images from your data source

TIP:If you can still see the script text in each cell of the label template, rather than the actual QR code image, the press ALT+F9 to switch from Text View to Image View.

Save and print. Done!


Create QR Codes in Bulk Using Our Batch Processing Feature

A standard part of the QR Stuff paid subscriber feature set is the ability to automatically generate batches of up to 500 QR codes by simply uploading a spreadsheet file containing the details of up to 500 QR codes. The end result is a whole heap of individually and uniquely named QR codes that are ready to be imported into a label template using the process outlined above.

Click here for our batch processing user guide, or visit our FAQ section.

 


QRStuff QR Codes Go Visual

Posted: February 10th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

Visualead and QRStuff have joined forces to make QR codes more attractive for users and more valueable for businesses seeking to engage mobile users.

QR codes are all around us, and people are used to seeing and scanning them, yet they aren’t considered attractive. Visualead’s patent-pending technology changes how people engage with QR codes and enables users to easily embed them into any image or advertisement using a simple, user-friendly process that doesn’t require any graphic design skills.

Visual QR Codes are taking the humble QR code to the next level by keeping the tried-and-tested technology of the QR code and adding the elements of aesthetics and design to it. Visualead, the creators of the Visual QR Code, has teamed up with QRStuff, one of the the world’s most popular QR code generators, to allow the capabilities of a standard QR code to be added into any design or image.

QRStuff QR Codes Go Visual With Visualead

Now anyone can integrate a QR code into any image, blending the familiar QR codes that people recognize with the visual design that people prefer, and in so doing creating a communicative, creative and effective visual call-to-action.

To get your Visual QR Code just vist www.qrstuff.com, create your QR code as usual, and then click on the Visualead banner in the bottom corner of the screen.  The QRStuff and Visualead websites are directly integrated so you (and the actual QR code you just created) will be transferred seamlessly to the Visualead website where you can complete the process of making your QR code visual.

To get your Visual QR Code just vist www.qrstuff.com

Who You Calling Ugly?

While there are other emerging technologies, QR codes are currently the most popular tool for businesses to connect their offline content to online interactive experiences, a bridge that instantly connects the physical world to the digital world.

Unfortunately the bland physical appearance of QR codes is often cited as one of its negatives. Customers are keen to engage and interact with companies and brands via their mobile devices but apparently they seem to find these blocky geometric computer-generated symbols a bit of turn-off.

Keep The Technology, Improve The Aesthetics

Incorporating a Visual QR Code into an ad layout or image combines the incentive to interact and engage with the technical means to do so, making Visual QR Codes more engaging, more communicative and significantly more effective with scans rates shown to be up to 25% higher when compared to a traditional QR code.

There’s also no more guessing where a QR code will lead to with a design-based approach making  more opportunities available to communicate to users exactly what to expect when they scan the QR code.

Blending QR codes with visual design

Because of their look and feel, and also to save space in the layout, standard QR codes are usually reduced in size and tucked away in a lower corner of an ad. This reduces their impact and compromises their effectiveness – they can often go un-noticed or ignored, and scan rates suffer accordingly.

Visual QR Codes, on the other hand, allow the QR code to be placed front and center making it part of the ad rather than just a footnote to it. It ties in visually and aesthetically and becomes an integrated part of the message and an obvious extension of the principal call to action.

This video explains more:

Any Image Can Become A Visual QR Code

Whether its your logo, your favorite social network icon or your app icon, you can now use any image to empower your brand awareness, be more attractive, be more intuitive, and get you more scans!

Any Image Can Become A Visual QR Code

About Visualead

Founded in early 2012, Visualead’s mission is to make QR codes more appealing for customers and more valuable for brands by instantly and seamlessly blending them with any design, attracting users and increasing engagement.

The technology behind the Visualead’s Visual QR Codes is a unique, patent-pending image processing system developed by Visualead’s image processing and algorithms experts that enables users to merge a QR code with an image while preserving it as a fully operational QR code.

For more information about Visualead, contact Uriel Peled, co-founder & CMO of Visualead.

 


QR Codes For App Store Downloads

Posted: December 28th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

So, your’re a developer or publisher with an app in play across the various major phone platforms and think that a QR code would be a great way for your prospective users to download it? The only problem is that several platforms means several QR codes – one for the iTunes App Store, one for Google Play, etc – which makes things a bit messy. And what do you do about people that scan the QR code with a smartphone type that you don’t offer a version for?

With our “App Store Download” QR code data type we’ve solved this problem for you with one QR code that covers all smartphone types. At the heart of this QR code is an automatic device-type detection script at our end (that is completely transparent to the person scanning the QR code) that identifies what sort of phone they have and makes sure that the user is seamlessly sent to the app store that matches their smartphone type.

Simply enter URL’s of the pages on the various app stores that you do have versions for and this QR code looks after the rest.

For smartphone types that you don’t have an app version for (say, Blackberry) you can also specify a “Fallback URL” that the users of those non-supported devices will be automatically redirected to. This can be the website for the app itself, a greeting page for users of non-supported phones inviting expressions of interest for the release of that particular platform version, an announcement that that version will be available soon, or any other URL you think is appropriate.

Since we released it in May 2012, the “App Store Download” data type has been the single most commented-on data type by our users, with many taking the time to email us about how useful it is, particularly considering the cumbersome length and complexity of most app store URL’s.

How To Make One

  1. Go to www.qrstuff.com and choose the “App Store Download” data type.
  2. Enter the link to the page for your app on the iTunes App Store.
  3. If you have an Android version too then tick the box next to “Google Play App Link” and enter the link to the page for your app on the Google Play store. If you only have an Android version then untick the iTunes one and go straight to Step 5.
  4. Repeat if you have a Windows and/or Blackberry version.
  5. Enter your Fallback URL.
  6. Download your finished QR code.

To maximise the flexibility of this type of QR code we’re also testing built-in implicit support for app store custom URI’s when used in place of standard http:// style page links. The custom URI’s currently supported are:

  • itms:// and itms-services:// for iTunes links
  • market:// for Google Play links
  • appworld:// for Blackberry App World

As an extra bonus this data type is fully dynamic so if you’re a paid subscriber you will be able to update the app store links whenever you need to.

Try It Out

Since our favourite QR code scanning app, Scan, is available on iPhone, Android and Windows Phone we’ve used that as our example above. We’ve added the links to the app store pages for their iPhone, Android and Windows Phone versions and made their own website the Fallback URL.

The finished QR code, and how it works, is shown below – try it out for yourself.

If you come across any smartphone types that don’t give the correct result just email us with the details – we’re constantly updating our device-detection database as new phone models are released.


Make A Dropbox QR Code

Posted: December 23rd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

We’ve just released a new data type that allows you to make a QR code that links to a Dropbox file or folder.

With the new “Share Link” feature on Dropbox you no longer need to create a Public Folder to share files. Just create the link, add it to a QR code, and you can instantly share Dropbox files with anyone, even non-Dropbox users, simply by them scanning the QR code.

Here’s how to use it.

Create A Dropbox Shared Link

  1. Sign in to your Dropbox account.
  2. Click on the file you want to share.
  3. Select “Share Link” from the action bar across the top
  4. A pop-up appears – click on “Get Link”
  5. You will then be shown a preview of your file. Copy the link from your browser’s address bar to use when you create your QR code (below).

Image courtesy of www.dropbox.com.

Here’s a link to sharing using the Dropbox desktop application.

Create Your QR Code

  1. Go to www.qrstuff.com
  2. Choose the “Dropbox” data type.
  3. Paste the link from Step 5 above into the box provided.
  4. Download your QR code. Done!

This article is not intended to imply or state that there is a partnership or relationship between Dropbox and QRStuff.com.
Dropbox is a trademark of Dropbox Inc.

 


Dynamic QR Codes

Posted: August 12th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

Dynamic QR CodesA basic fundamental of QR codes is that the pattern of modules in the QR code image is a direct graphical representation of the data it contains. That’s just the way QR codes work and is the essence of the algorithm that creates the QR code image.

This has one big downside – changing the data encoded into the QR code has the consequential result of also changing the QR code image which, at first glance, presents a significant problem if the website URL that the QR code links to needs to be changed.  How to update the information in a QR code that’s already been published?

We grappled with this dilemma in mid-2008 and figured out that the simplest way to address this problem was to have a short URL actually in the QR code and then provide our users with the ability to change where the short URL then redirected to. In this way, the content of the QR code (and the QR code image itself) didn’t change (since it always contained that short URL), but where the user was sent to after the QR code was scanned could be changed at will behind-the-scenes.

This approach doesn’t actually make the QR code itself “dynamic” because its contents stays the same, but by putting a user-editable short URL into the QR code it gives the impression that the QR code can be changed and acheived the outcome we were after – this is still how all dynamic QR codes work to this day.

At the time we just thought this was a good way to pre-emptively make the creation of QR codes a bit more user-friendly, so we simply introduced it as a feature of the QRStuff.com website in October 2008 without any fuss or fanfare as a standard part of the way we did things.

Dynamic QR Codes

In the past 18 months or so the term “Dynamic QR Code” has been retrospectively applied to what we’ve been doing as a matter of course for nearly 4 years. Even though dynamic QR codes have been heralded of late as some new breakthrough in the underlying technology, they’re not. The only “new” thing about them is now they have a new name, which is probably a good thing because we originally called them “Re-Writeable QR Codes” which was pretty lame – we like the term “Dynamic QR Codes” much better.

So there you have it:

  • Static QR Code: The actual destination website URL is placed directly into the QR code and can’t be modified.
  • Dynamic QR Code: A short URL is placed into the QR code which then transparently re-directs the user to the intended destination website URL, with the short URL redirection destination URL able to be changed after the QR code has been created.

Dynamic QR codes greatly extend the useful life of a single QR code since, once published, where it sends the user to can be changed at will without it having to be replaced with a new QR code image every time the destination changes. A single QR code image can be deployed permanently in-the-wild and then simply re-tasked as and when required – link it to your own website this week, a YouTube video next week, your Facebook page the week after that, etc, etc. Or to different offer or coupon pages on your own website as each new promotional program is released over time.

They’re also handy when you have a temporary “placeholder” URL that will be changed once the final content or URL location is ready to go but the QR code needs to be created ahead of time, if the actual URL of your content changes unexpectedly (say, after a website rebuild), if you have a client who always changes their mind about what links where ( ;-) ), or simply to protect the on-going operation of the QR code from unexpected future circumstances.

QRStuff And Dynamic QR Codes

While many QR code generators make using their URL shortener mandatory, so every QR code is potentially dynamic by default, QRStuff.com users have the added flexibility of being able to choose whether they wish to make their QR code dynamic or static when they initially create their QR code.

With QRStuff you can make static QR codes or dynamic QR codes - your choice

Why, you ask, would anyone not want to create a dynamic QR code? Static QR codes have a few significant, but often overlooked, benefits that are outlined in an earlier blog post  and regular user feedback over the years has confirmed that our original decision not to force everybody down the dynamic QR code path was an appropriate one to make, and has given us a strong point-of-difference in the broader market of QR code generation.

Anyway, the ability to edit the destination URL of a dynamic QR code is a standard part of our paid subscriber feature set.

When you log into your subscriber account history, any dynamic QR codes you’ve created will have an “Edit URL” option in the extended information about that QR code (click the “Manage” tab to the right of the history listing).

Editing A Dynamic QR Code With QRStuff.com

Using that subscriber feature, the destination URL that the short URL in the dynamic QR code redirects to can be modified at will without altering the QR code image. There are no limits on the number of times you can update the short URL destination.

About Our Short URL’s

As with all the mission-critical core service infrastructure of the QRStuff.com website, we have our own custom-built URL shortening service hosted on our own servers, and based on the qrs.ly domain that we own and host ourselves.

We don’t rely on any third-party services for the generation, management or security of the 2.5 million short URL’s that we’ve issued to date, ensuring that they work in a manner that is optimized for use with QR codes, fully protects the privacy of our users, and guarantees the confidentiality of the analytics data associated with the short URL’s themselves.

For added security, each short URL is generated randomly, rather than sequentially, so that consecutive short URL’s can’t be guessed or anticipated. We also don’t “recycle” short URL’s – every QR code created is given its own unique short URL regardless of whether other QR codes created by others users link to that same destination URL.

 


Q1 2012: QR Code Trends

Posted: April 8th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

The following data is based on the QR codes created by our website users during January, February and March 2012.

Key Points

  • Overall global QR Code activity is up 381% on Q1 2011 and up 16% on Q4 2011.
  • The Top 5 countries (Untied States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and Germany) have remained the same however their collective share of global QR code activitiy has decreased marginally since Q4 2011.
  • While the relative proportion of global QR code activitiy for the USA decreased from 49.0% in Q4 2011 to 48.1% in Q1 2012, QR code activity in absolute terms increased by 14% in the USA over the same period.
  • Email and SMS QR codes have increased in popularity at the expense of QR codes containing a website URL. Google Maps QR codes also showed a strong increase in popularity.
  • The disparity in device type used for scanning appears to have stabilised at approximately 60% iOS and approximately 30% Android.

QR Code Activity

While the stratospheric year-on-year growth rates seen through 2011 (albeit off a low 2010 base) have begun to tail off somewhat, significant increases between Q4 2011 and Q1 2012 were recorded for all countries in the top 20 with the exception of the Netherlands, that showed a reduction of 6%.

Overall the yearly growth rates reflect the adoption cycle of QR codes with earlier adopters like USA and Canada now stabilising in growth rates, while Europe exhibited in the last 2 quarters the sort of growth rates that North Amercia saw in Q3 and Q4 last year.

As the major markets that are using QR codes each move past the stage of over-heated and frenzied hype and opportunistic “snake oil” marketing, a much more solid and structured phase of adaption and deployment will follow characterised by marketers becoming more experienced and mature in their use, advertisers having a more realistic expectation of the role QR codes can play in their promotional mix, and the general consumer becoming more familiar with seeing them around.

Position Country Of Origin % Of Global Total % Increase
Q1 2012 Q4 2011 Q1 2012 Q4 2011 Q4 11 to Q1 12 Q1 11 to Q1 12
1 1 United States 48.1% 49.0% 14% 314%
2 2 United Kingdom 12.1% 11.9% 18% 644%
3 3 Canada 5.1% 5.3% 13% 298%
4 4 Australia 3.5% 3.7% 10% 565%
5 5 Germany 2.4% 1.9% 47% 561%
6 7 India 1.8% 1.6% 25% 500%
7 8 Denmark 1.7% 1.6% 25% 439%
8 9 Mexico 1.4% 1.5% 12% 935%
9 6 Netherlands 1.4% 1.7% -6% 202%
10 12 Singapore 1.0% 0.9% 30% 564%
11 11 France 1.0% 0.9% 24% 229%
12 10 Malaysia 1.0% 1.1% 2% 943%
13 15 Spain 0.9% 0.8% 33% 338%
14 14 New Zealand 0.8% 0.8% 16% 721%
15 13 Norway 0.8% 0.8% 8% 969%
16 16 Brazil 0.7% 0.8% 6% 444%
17 17 Italy 0.7% 0.7% 17% 135%
18 14 Sweden 0.7% 0.6% 38% 463%
19 26 Turkey 0.7% 0.5% 59% 579%
20 20 Israel 0.7% 0.6% 24% 702%
Total 86.4% 86.6% 16% 381%

“QR Code Activity” is a weighted index that we have created that seeks to quantify the relative changes in the overall number of people engaging with QR codes over time, as both QR code users and QR code publishers. The underlying data is taken from four sources – QR codes created on the QRStuff.com website, scan event data that we record on behalf of our users, our own website visitation analytics, and Google Insights For SearchTM data for key industry search terms. The latter data source is included to normalise any bias resulting from the growth in our user base having consistently out-stripped the growth in the market by 20% to 35% during any given quarter.

One interesting take-out when looking at the underlying data is that while the number of QR codes created at QRStuff.com increased by 16% between Q4 2011  and Q1 2012, the number of scan events recorded increased by 156% over the same period indicating a strong growth in the ongoing level of user engagement with those QR codes created and published in previous months.

QR Codes Created

Since 2011 QR codes containing email messages and SMS messages have increased significantly in popularity, as have QR codes containing Google Maps locations, with that increase being at the expense of QR codes containing a website URL.

Position Content Of QR Codes Percentage Of Total % Increase
Q1 2012 Q4 2011 Q1 2012 Q4 2011 Q4 to Q1
1 1 Website URL 60.3% 66.4% 6%
2 2 Plain Text 15.3% 14.5% 23%
3 3 vCard Contact Details 10.6% 9.9% 25%
4 4 Social Media Links 3.4% 2.4% 60%
5 7 Email Address 2.4% 1.0% 178%
6 6 Google Maps Location 2.4% 1.1% 141%
7 5 Youtube Video Link 1.9% 1.7% 32%
8 10 Email Message 1.1% 0.5% 143%
9 9 SMS Message 1.0% 0.7% 67%
10 8 Phone Number 0.8% 0.9% 5%
Total 99.2% 99.3% 17%

Scanning Device Used

iPhones are still the most popular devices used for scanning QR codes. While Android devices showed some sign of narrowing the gap in Q3 and Q4 2011, the disparity is now pretty much 2:1.  Blackberry’s continue to rapidly slide in popularity, however Windows Mobile devices have gained some of the ground they lost earlier in the year.

We still hold to the point of view that the scanning apps available for iPhone users are of a significantly higher quality and sophistication leading to higher useage rates, higher user satisfaction and higher user retention for iPhones compared to other devices.

The continuing publication of QR codes that are too dense to be read by a smartphone that doesn’t have a high resolution camera and/or optical image stabilisation will also continue to bias useage rates in favour of iPhones and away from older or less sophisticated devices on other platforms that give the user a less satisfactory scan result.

 


QR Codes In Tourism And Travel

Posted: March 22nd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

If you’re planning on using QR codes in the tourism or travel industry the opportunities go way beyond simply adding a QR code to the back page of your brochure that links to your website.

As the articles shown below point out, QR codes in tourism, travel and hospitality can be used for product and destination marketing, in-house guest engagement, interpretive signage, adding multimedia dimensions to self-guided tours, and linking online content to traditional print media.

Finally, here’s a video that highlights, in a humorous way, a few of the pitfalls to avoid when putting a QR code campaign together.

Image Sources: www.skipedia.co.uk, www.hotelmarketingstrategies.com, www.funbeach.com, www.3seventy.com


A Shrinky Dinks QR Code Dog Tag

Posted: January 18th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

I saw a tweet the other day from Sarah announcing that she’d made a Shrinky Dink dog tag from a QR codes she’d made at QRStuff.com so I emailed her for some more information.

The process I followed to make my dog tags was as follows:

  1. Create a vCard QR code with your contact details at www.qrstuff.com.
  2. Download the QR code image and enlarge it to 3 times the desired finished size.
  3. I hand traced it onto some Shrinky Dinks plastic although they’ve got an InkJet printer version now.
  4. Cut out desired shape and punch a hole in it.
  5. Bake it as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
  6. Insert a jump ring into the hole and thread some bead chain through jump ring.
  7. Attach to dog.

Cool!


QR Code Error Correction

Posted: December 14th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: General | No Comments »

Part of the robustness of QR codes in the physical environment is their ability to sustain “damage” and continue to function even when a part of the QR code image is obscured, defaced or removed. 

This is acheived by using the Reed-Solomon Error Correction algorithm – some serious algebra that happens in background when the QR code is created. The original data in the QR code is converted into a polynomial, the number of unique points required to uniquely define that polynomial is determined, and this point set is added back into the QR code so that it then also contains the original data expressed as a polynomial.

If that description threatened to make your head explode, just call it “mathematically adding backup data to the QR code”.

There are 4 error correction levels used for QR codes, with each one adding different amounts of “backup” data depending on how much damage the QR code is expected to suffer in its intended environment, and hence how much error correction may be required:

  • Level L – up to 7% damage
  • Level M – up to 15% damage
  • Level Q – up to 25% damage
  • Level H – up to 30% damage

A fundamental part of the way QR codes work is that the more data you put into them, the more rows and columns of modules will be introduced into the QR code to compensate for the increased data load. As the error correction level increases, this means there will also be an increase in the number of rows and columns of modules required to store the original data plus the increasing amount of backup codewords. This is shown in the diagram below – the QR code becomes more dense as the error correction increases from Level L to Level H even though the QR codes contain exactly the same website URL.

Quite conveniently, there’s also 2 modules down in the bottom left-hand corner of every QR code that display what the error correction level used in that QR code is.

So here are the take-outs:

  • The lower the error correction level, the less dense the QR code image is, which improves minimum printing size.
  • The higher the error correction level, the more damage it can sustain before it becomes unreadabale.
  • Level L or Level M represent the best compromise between density and ruggedness for general marketing use. 
  • Level Q and Level H are generally recommended for industrial environments where keeping the QR code clean or un-damaged will be a challenge.

As an aside, this is also one of the reasons why a QR code containing the same data will look different depending on which QR code generator you use – it depends on the error correction level being used by that particular website. Even though there is a single ISO standard for QR codes, there are variables within the ISO standard (error correction level being one of them) that will result in a different looking QR code image based on how that particular QR code creation website sets these variables. 

This doesn’t mean that any particular QR code generator is any more or any less standards-compliant than any other, it just means that the people behind the different generators have made different choices when setting the underlying technical specifications and parameters for the QR codes that their website creates.